107 NE Monroe Peoria, Illinois 61602-1070

The Sherlock Holmes Story Society

Meets at North Branch at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of every month except November (see alternate date specified below). Call (309) 497-2701 for more information.
All of the group’ s 2018 reading will come from The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle, the second short story collection in the Holmes canon.

December 27

“The Final Problem”

2019 Calendar

Sherlock Holmes Story Society

This group meets in the North Branch Seminar Room at 6:30 pm on the 4th Thursday of the month (except for November and December, when we’ve switched to the 3rd Thursday to avoid holidays). New members are always welcome, whether you’re a seasoned Sherlockian or a newcomer to the canon! Please call 309-497-2701 if you have any questions.

This year, we are continuing our chronological exploration of the short stories with The Return of Sherlock Holmes.

January 24

“The Adventure of the Empty House”

If you're going to make an appearance after years of being 'dead,' you should go big or go home! Holmes re-emerges in London and immediately gets down to business. In this story, he bests 'the second most dangerous man in London.' (Any guesses about the first?)

February 28

“The Adventure of the Norwood Builder”

Lawyers are generally believed to be staunch upholders of the law. But, in this story, a lawyer named John McFarlane finds himself at the center of a serious accusation: murder. The deceased is one of McFarlane's clients, Jonas Oldacre, for whom McFarlane recently created a will. While the police believe the lawyer is guilty, Holmes is less certain.

March 28

“The Adventure of the Dancing Men”

Like many of Holmes' adventures, this story involves a series of coded messages sent to an unwilling recipient, Hilton Cubitt. Cubitt's wife is disturbed by the contents of the messages. Cubitt, himself, maybe should have been more disturbed since he ultimately loses his life as a result. Cubitt's wife attempts suicide. Suspicious? You decide.

April 25

“The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist”

There's not much worse than being followed on your weekly bicycle expeditions. Unless, of course, you count kidnapping. Violet Smith is the target here, enduring both unsettling behaviors from one man and unwanted romantic advances from the other. Luckily, Holmes comes to her rescue.

May 23

“The Adventure of the Priory School”

Oh, how tangled family relationships get, especially when your illegitimate, secret son hatches a plot to kidnap his half-brother, the heir to the throne. Throw in some shady accomplices and blackmail, and you have all the makings of a family reunion gone bad.

June 27

“The Adventure of Black Peter”

Holmes is called to investigate the murder of a distinctly unpleasant man who is found with a harpoon sticking out of his body in a landlubber’s cabin.

July 25

“The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton”

The title character is the ultimate blackmailer and, what’s worse, believes that since his victims are themselves morally repugnant, standard conventions of morality do not apply to his criminal offenses against them. How can Holmes bring the villain to justice (or can he)?

August 22

“The Adventure of the Six Napoleons”

The titular emperors are actually just plaster busts and all signs point to their destruction being the work of a mentally disturbed immigrant. Holmes suspects the madness of the destruction is a cover for something far more rational and calculated. Needless to say, Holmes is correct.

September 26

“The Adventure of the Three Students”

A college instructor makes the mistake of leaving important papers briefly unattended. Holmes is called upon to determine which one of the title characters is the cheater who took advantage of that opportunity afforded by the absent professor.

October 24

“The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez”

Inspector Stanley Hopkins[1] of Scotland Yard asks the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes to help him investigate a mysterious murder. The victim was a young man named Willoughby Smith who had been secretary to an elderly invalid known as Professor Coram. Smith shared a house with the Professor and two female servants. One of those servants found Smith, fatally wounded but not yet dead, after he had been stabbed in the neck with a small knife. A pair of woman's pince-nez spectacles were later discovered in Smith's hand. Curiously, since Professor Coram is obviously male, Smith's last words were, "The professor - it was she".

November 21* (3rd Thursday)

“The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter”

Holmes is called in to investigate the disappearance of Godfrey Staunton. Holmes has been asked to locate many missing things in which the political stability of Europe has hung in the balance, but this time something truly monumental is dependent upon Holmes solving the case: Cambridge will almost certainly lose an important ruby match to Oxford if key player Staunton is not found before the game.

December 19* (3rd Thursday)

“The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”

Holmes wakes Doctor Watson up early one winter morning to rush to a murder scene at the Abbey Grange near Chislehurst. Sir Eustace Brackenstall has been killed, apparently by burglars. Inspector Stanley Hopkins believes that it was the infamous Randall gang, a father and two sons, who have committed several other burglaries in the neighborhood.

 

We will finish this collection’s final short story off in 2020 before continuing with the next collection in the Holmes canon: His Last Bow

Sherlock Holmes Story Society

This group meets in the North Branch Seminar Room at 6:30 pm on the 4th Thursday of the month (except for November and December, when we’ve switched to the 3rd Thursday to avoid holidays). New members are always welcome, whether you’re a seasoned Sherlockian or a newcomer to the canon! Please call 309-497-2701 if you have any questions.

This year, we are continuing our chronological exploration of the short stories with The Return of Sherlock Holmes.

January 24

“The Adventure of the Empty House”

If you're going to make an appearance after years of being 'dead,' you should go big or go home! Holmes re-emerges in London and immediately gets down to business. In this story, he bests 'the second most dangerous man in London.' (Any guesses about the first?)

February 28

“The Adventure of the Norwood Builder”

Lawyers are generally believed to be staunch upholders of the law. But, in this story, a lawyer named John McFarlane finds himself at the center of a serious accusation: murder. The deceased is one of McFarlane's clients, Jonas Oldacre, for whom McFarlane recently created a will. While the police believe the lawyer is guilty, Holmes is less certain.

March 28

“The Adventure of the Dancing Men”

Like many of Holmes' adventures, this story involves a series of coded messages sent to an unwilling recipient, Hilton Cubitt. Cubitt's wife is disturbed by the contents of the messages. Cubitt, himself, maybe should have been more disturbed since he ultimately loses his life as a result. Cubitt's wife attempts suicide. Suspicious? You decide.

April 25

“The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist”

There's not much worse than being followed on your weekly bicycle expeditions. Unless, of course, you count kidnapping. Violet Smith is the target here, enduring both unsettling behaviors from one man and unwanted romantic advances from the other. Luckily, Holmes comes to her rescue.

May 23

“The Adventure of the Priory School”

Oh, how tangled family relationships get, especially when your illegitimate, secret son hatches a plot to kidnap his half-brother, the heir to the throne. Throw in some shady accomplices and blackmail, and you have all the makings of a family reunion gone bad.

June 27

“The Adventure of Black Peter”

Holmes is called to investigate the murder of a distinctly unpleasant man who is found with a harpoon sticking out of his body in a landlubber’s cabin.

July 25

“The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton”

The title character is the ultimate blackmailer and, what’s worse, believes that since his victims are themselves morally repugnant, standard conventions of morality do not apply to his criminal offenses against them. How can Holmes bring the villain to justice (or can he)?

August 22

“The Adventure of the Six Napoleons”

The titular emperors are actually just plaster busts and all signs point to their destruction being the work of a mentally disturbed immigrant. Holmes suspects the madness of the destruction is a cover for something far more rational and calculated. Needless to say, Holmes is correct.

September 26

“The Adventure of the Three Students”

A college instructor makes the mistake of leaving important papers briefly unattended. Holmes is called upon to determine which one of the title characters is the cheater who took advantage of that opportunity afforded by the absent professor.

October 24

“The Adventure of the Golden Pince-Nez”

Inspector Stanley Hopkins[1] of Scotland Yard asks the brilliant consulting detective Sherlock Holmes to help him investigate a mysterious murder. The victim was a young man named Willoughby Smith who had been secretary to an elderly invalid known as Professor Coram. Smith shared a house with the Professor and two female servants. One of those servants found Smith, fatally wounded but not yet dead, after he had been stabbed in the neck with a small knife. A pair of woman's pince-nez spectacles were later discovered in Smith's hand. Curiously, since Professor Coram is obviously male, Smith's last words were, "The professor - it was she".

November 21* (3rd Thursday)

“The Adventure of the Missing Three-Quarter”

Holmes is called in to investigate the disappearance of Godfrey Staunton. Holmes has been asked to locate many missing things in which the political stability of Europe has hung in the balance, but this time something truly monumental is dependent upon Holmes solving the case: Cambridge will almost certainly lose an important ruby match to Oxford if key player Staunton is not found before the game.

December 19* (3rd Thursday)

“The Adventure of the Abbey Grange”

Holmes wakes Doctor Watson up early one winter morning to rush to a murder scene at the Abbey Grange near Chislehurst. Sir Eustace Brackenstall has been killed, apparently by burglars. Inspector Stanley Hopkins believes that it was the infamous Randall gang, a father and two sons, who have committed several other burglaries in the neighborhood.

 

We will finish this collection’s final short story off in 2020 before continuing with the next collection in the Holmes canon: His Last Bow